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Install Apache on Debian 9 Server - Step by Step Process ?

This article covers how to install an Apache web server on your Debian 9 server. The Apache HTTP server is the most widely-used web server in the world. It provides many powerful features including dynamically loadable modules, robust media support, and extensive integration with other popular software.


How to Install Apache ?

1. Let's begin by updating the local package index to reflect the latest upstream changes:

$ sudo apt update

2. Then, install the apache2 package:

$ sudo apt install apache2

 After confirming the installation, apt will install Apache and all required dependencies.


The Apache profiles begin with WWW:

1. WWW: This profile opens only port 80 (normal, unencrypted web traffic).

2. WWW Cache: This profile opens only port 8080 (sometimes used for caching and web proxies).

3. WWW Full: This profile opens both port 80 (normal, unencrypted web traffic) and port 443 (TLS/SSL encrypted traffic).

4. WWW Secure: This profile opens only port 443 (TLS/SSL encrypted traffic).


How to Manage Apache Process ?

To stop your web server, type:

$ sudo systemctl stop apache2

To start the web server when it is stopped, type:

$ sudo systemctl start apache2

To stop and then start the service again, type:

$ sudo systemctl restart apache2

If you are simply making configuration changes, Apache can often reload without dropping connections. To do this, use this command:

$ sudo systemctl reload apache2

By default, Apache is configured to start automatically when the server boots. If this is not what you want, disable this behavior by typing:

$ sudo systemctl disable apache2

To re-enable the service to start up at boot, type:

$ sudo systemctl enable apache2

Apache should now start automatically when the server boots again.


Use the Who Command in Debian 10 - How to do it ?

This article covers the who command in Linux along with its some of the useful command line options.

Sometimes, while working on the command line, you might want to know more about logged in users.

There exists a command line utility who which you can use to access this kind of information.

Basically, the who command shows who all are logged in.

Here's its syntax:

$ who [OPTION]... [ FILE | ARG1 ARG2 ]


To access time of last system boot?

For this, use the -b command line option:

$ who -b


Install and Configure Apache Web Server with Virtual Host on Debian 10 - Do it now ?

This article covers how to perform installation and configuration of Apache web server on Debian 10.

Also, you will learn how to create virtual hosts on an Apache server and troubleshoot errors. These steps are almost the same for Ubuntu and LinuxMint distributions.

Apache HTTP Server is a free and open-source web server that delivers web content through the internet. It is commonly referred to as Apache and after development, it quickly became the most popular HTTP client on the web.


On most systems if you installed Apache with a package manager, or it came preinstalled, the Apache configuration file is located in one of these locations: /etc/apache2/httpd. conf. /etc/apache2/apache2.


Debian/Ubuntu Linux Specific Commands to Start/Stop/Restart Apache:

1. Restart Apache 2 web server, enter: # /etc/init.d/apache2 restart. $ sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 restart.

2. To stop Apache 2 web server, enter: # /etc/init.d/apache2 stop.

3. To start Apache 2 web server, enter: # /etc/init.d/apache2 start.


To check running status of LAMP stack:

1. For Ubuntu: # service apache2 status.

2. For CentOS: # /etc/init.d/httpd status.

3. For Ubuntu: # service apache2 restart.

4. For CentOS: # /etc/init.d/httpd restart.

5. You can use mysqladmin command to find out whether mysql is running or not.