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Install Chrony on Linux Mint - Easy steps to do it ?

This article covers how to #install Chrony on Linux Mint 20. Once it will be installed on your system, its daemon will silently work in the background to synchronize your system's clock with the #NTP server. 

However, if you do not want Chrony to perform this job any longer, then you can simply uninstall it as well.

Chrony is a flexible implementation of the Network Time Protocol (NTP). 

It is used to synchronize the system clock from different NTP servers, reference clocks or via manual input.


Chrony comes with two programs:

1. chronyc – command line interface for chrony

2. chronyd – daemon that can be started at boot time


How to Install #Chrony in #Linux :

On some systems, chrony may be installed by default. Still if the package is missing, you can easily install it. 


You can install chrony Using your default package manager tool on your respective Linux distributions using following command:

# yum -y install chrony    [On CentOS/RHEL]

# apt install chrony       [On Debian/Ubuntu]

# dnf -y install chrony    [On Fedora 22+]


To check the status of chronyd use the following command:

# systemctl status chronyd      [On SystemD]

# /etc/init.d/chronyd status    [On Init]


If you want to enable chrony daemon upon boot, you can use the following command:

# systemctl enable chronyd       [On SystemD]

# chkconfig --add chronyd        [On Init]


How to Check Chrony Synchronization in Linux ?

To check if chrony is actually synchronized, we will use it's command line program chronyc, which has the tracking option which will provide relevant information:

# chronyc tracking


To check information about chrony’s sources, you can issue the following command:

# chronyc sources