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This article covers how to list users in Linux system and also differentiate difference between normal user and system user. Linux OS is unique because of its multi-user characteristic allowing multiple users on one system, at the same time. However, tracking all users is essential. The /etc/passwd file contains one line for each Linux user account, with seven fields delimited by colons. This is a text file. You can easily list users under Linux using the cat command or other commands such as grep command / egrep command and more. With this same approach, you can use the Linux commands to list all users on all Linux operating system, including Ubuntu, Debian, RHEL, Arch, Fedora, CentOS, and other distros.


To list all users on Linux, use the cat command as follows:

$ cat /etc/passwd



This article will guide you on the different methods to list down all the Linux system users. To know whether a particular user is having sudo access or not, we can use -l and -U options together. For example, If the user has sudo access, it will print the level of #sudo access for that particular user. 

If the user don't have sudo access, it will print that user is not allowed to run sudo on localhost.

To change users in #Linux:

The su command lets you switch the current user to any other user. 

If you need to run a command as a different (non-root) user, use the –l [username] option to specify the user account. 

Additionally, su can also be used to change to a different shell interpreter on the fly.




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