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This article covers the process of Mounting and unmounting a drive or an ISO image in Linux. After creating disk partitions and formatting them properly, you may want to mount or unmount your drives.

On Linux, mounting drives is done via mountpoints on the virtual filesystem, allowing system users to navigate the filesystem as well as create and delete files on them.


How to List Mounted File Systems and Linux Drives ?

To display all currently attached file systems we will type:

$ mount

By default, the output will include all of the file systems including the virtual ones such as cgroup, sysfs, and others. Each line contains information about the device name, the directory to which the device is mounted, the filesystem type and the mount options.


How to install NFS client on Ubuntu and Debian ?

NFS stands for Network File System. To mount an NFS share you'll need to have the NFS client package installed on your Linux system.

1. To install NFS client on Ubuntu and Debian, type:

$ sudo apt install nfs-common

2. To install NFS client on CentOS and Fedora:

$ sudo yum install nfs-utils



This article will guide you on how you can setup NFS server and client in Debian 10 system. Also, you will learn steps to install the NFS server and client, configure NFS shared directories, and mount/unmount the NFS shares on the client system.

Configuring a system to share files and directories using NFS is straightforward. 

NFS uses port 2049. NFSv3 and NFSv2 use the portmapper service on TCP or UDP port 111.

Every filesystem being exported to remote users via NFS, as well as the access rights relating to those filesystems, is located in the /etc/exports file.

To check #NFS mount #Linux:

1. Use showmount to show NFS shares.

2. Use exportfs to show NFS shares.

3. Use master export file /var/lib/nfs/etab to show NFS shares.

4. Use mount to list NFS mount points.

5. Use nfsstat to list NFS mount points.

6. Use /proc/mounts to list NFS mount points.




This article will guide you on how to use the #mount and #umount command to attach and detach various file systems. You can perform this task on several media options like ISO file, NFS share and USB flash drive. Mounting will not erase everything. The #disk does get modified slightly each time you mount it, though. However, since you have serious directory corruption which cannot be repaired by Disk Utility you need to repair and replace the directory before it can be mounted.




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