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Free Up Disk Space in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - How to do this ?

This article covers different effective ways to free up some disk space on your Ubuntu system or other Linux distro. 

Although Linux does not clutter up like Windows, it may be useful to occasionally clean up Linux. Especially in systems with a smaller hard drive it can be beneficial to clean Linux. Occasionally cleaning up Linux does have to be done on a daily basis or weekly basis, 1 time per month is more than sufficient.


Terminal commands to free up some disk space on your Linux System:

There are 3 terminal commands which you can use top clean up Linux Mint. 

Each terminal will be explained about what they do and remove. 

All three commands contribute to free up disk space.

1. sudo apt-get autoclean

This terminal command deletes all .deb files from /var/cache/apt/archives. It basically cleans up the apt-get cache.

2. sudo apt-get clean

This terminal command is used to free up the disk space by cleaning up downloaded .deb files from the local repository.

3. sudo apt-get autoremove

This terminal command used to remove packages that were automatically installed to satisfy dependencies for some package and no longer needed by those packages.


Methods to check an available memory in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS ?

This article will guide you on how different methods of checking the available #memory in #Ubuntu 20.04. By following any of these methods, you can check the available memory along with lots of other useful memory statistics of your Ubuntu 20.04 system.

Logical Volume Manager (#LVM) is a software-based RAID-like system that lets you create "pools" of storage and add hard drive space to those pools as needed. There are lots of reasons to use it, especially in a data center or any place where storage requirements change over time.

#Linux by default tries to use RAM in order to speed up disk operations by making use of available memory for creating buffers (file system metadata) and #cache (pages with actual contents of files or block devices), helping the system to run faster because disk information is already in memory which saves I/O #operations 

To check memory #usage on Linux:

1. free command. The free command is the most simple and easy to use command to check memory usage on linux.

2. /proc/meminfo. The next way to check memory usage is to read the /proc/meminfo file.

3. vmstat. The vmstat command with the s option, lays out the memory usage statistics much like the proc command.

4. top command.

5. htop.