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What does Web 3.0 mean ?

This article covers what Web 3.0 is, its features, and future. In fact, Web 3.0 is slated to be the new paradigm in web interaction and will mark a fundamental change in how developers create websites. Simply put, web 3.0 is the new phase of the internet’s evolution. The changes that web 3.0 is bringing to the internet is going to take it to a whole new level. Computer scientists and Internet experts believe that these changes are going to make the internet smarter and our lives easier.


Properties of Web 3.0:

  • Semantic Web.
  • Artificial Intelligence.
  • 3D Graphics.
  • Ubiquitous.



Advantages of the Web 3.0:

  • Increased information linking: Semantic web will help in the connectivity of online data.
  • Efficient searching.
  • Better marketing.
  • More efficient web browsing.
  • Effective communication.
  • Change human interaction.

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Display Asterisks While Typing Sudo Password in Linux (Ubuntu and CentOS Example)

This article covers how to show an asterisk as visual feedback while typing sudo password. Try once on Ubuntu or Centos by doing small changes on the file on /etc/sudoers file. 

To Show Asterisks While Typing Sudo Password in Linux, simply edit the /etc/sudoers file and add pwfeedback. This makes the asterisks visible when the password is entered. After the file is edited and saved, we type reset command for the effect to take place.

Install Terminator on Ubuntu 20.04

This article covers how to Install and Use Terminator, the Terminal Multiplexer. In fact, The terminator is similar to the built-in terminal with added features. You can arrange Terminals in a grid, Tab, Drag and drop re-ordering the terminal, use keyword shortcuts, create and save profiles. It is inspired by programs such as gnome-multi-term, quad console, and so on.

For more information about Terminator, visit its documentation.


How to Install terminator on your Linux system ?

For kali Linux:

$ sudo apt-get install terminator

For Ubuntu:

$ sudo apt install terminator

For Arch Linux:

$ sudo pacman -S terminator

For CentOS:

$ sudo yum install terminator

Set / Unset Environment Variables in Linux

This article covers how to set and unset both local and persistent environment variables in Linux. In fact, every time you start a shell session in Linux, the system goes through configuration files and sets up the environment accordingly. Environment variables play a significant role in this process.

Environment variables are a set of key value pairs stored on your Linux and used by processes in order to be able to perform specific operations. with the export command but also by modifying some system files to make them persistent.


How to Set Environment Variables on Linux using export ?

The easiest way to set environment variables is to use the export command:

$ export VAR="value"


How to Unset Environment Variables on Linux Using unset command ?

To unset an environment variable, use the unset command with the following syntax:

$ unset <variable>


Common Set of Environment Variables on Linux:

  • USER : the current username of the user using the system;
  • EDITOR : the program run to perform file edits on your host;
  • HOME : the home directory of the current user;
  • PATH : a colon separated list of directories where the system looks for commands;
  • PS1 : the primary prompt string (to define the display of the shell prompt);
  • PWD : the current working directory;
  • _ : the most recent command executed on the system (by the user)
  • MAIL : the path to the current user’s mailbox;
  • SHELL : the shell used in order to interpret commands on the system, it can be many different ones (like bash, sh, zsh or others);
  • LANG : the language encoding used on the system;
  • DESKTOP_SESSION : the current desktop used on your host (GNOME, KDE)
  • HISTFILESIZE : number of lines of command history stored in the history file;
  • HISTSIZE : number of lines of history allowed in memory;
  • UID : the current UID for the user.

Install an SSL Certificate in Tomcat for a Java project in Linux

This article covers how to generate CSR files and install CA signed SSL certificates in Tomcat for Java projects.


The need to create a self-signed certificate ?

  • It allows you to learn to create a keystore and certificate, which is good practice for getting an actual SSL/TLS certificate provided by a Certificate Authority.
  • It allows you to use a certificate right away and make sure it works successfully.
  • It's free.

Zstandard - An Open-Source Data Compression Algorithm for Ubuntu Linux system

This article covers how you can install zstd and how to use it on your Ubuntu Linux system. In fact, Zstandard is a fast compression algorithm, providing high compression ratios. It also offers a special mode for small data, called dictionary compression.

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